Album Reviews

The Lemon Twigs – A Dream Is All We Know

(Captured Tracks) UK release date: 3 May 2024


It’s not quite their Revolver, but who’s to say they won’t be releasing their very own Sgt Pepper by the time the year’s out?

The Lemon Twigs - A Dream Is All We Know The Lemon Twigs do not mess about. Pretty much exactly one year after releasing thier fourth album, Everything Harmony, they’ve delivered the follow-up, A Dream Is All We Know. It’s yet more evidence that this pair of preciously talented 20something brothers from New York are channelling the spirit of their heroes.

For, lest we forget, The Beatles once released Rubber Soul, Revolver and Sgt Pepper’s Lonely Hearts Club Band in an 18 month period. Bob Dylan just casually threw out Bringing It All Back Home, Highway 61 Revisited and Blonde On Blonde in about the same timeframe. Will we see yet another Lemon Twigs album follow in about six months’ time?

The comparison is, of course, hyperbole but there is a sense with the D’Addario brothers that they’re a band very much operating within their own timeframe – in the best possible way. Their songs sound as Teenage Fanclub have found some demo tapes of Brian Wilson jamming with Paul McCartney and decided to spruce them up. There’s blissful harmonies, jangly guitars and choruses that bury inside your head – and yes, while it’s not the most original sound, it’s a gloriously well put together record.

Opening track My Golden Years is a gorgeously upbeat breezy number which is also bathed in melancholy. It’s a song about how youth should be treasured as “in the blink of an eye, I’ll watch my golden years fly by”, and its pretty much the perfect three minute pop song.

It’s a trick they repeat throughout the record. How Can I Love Her More is a glorious stomp of a song, like The Beach Boys covering ELO, which has the added urgency of D’Addario singing like his girlfriend’s about to dump him any minute: “She walks right through that door and I say I miss you, but I don’t think it’s enough and I’m left here wonderin’ how can I love her more?”

They can do both upbeat pop (They Don’t Know How To Fall In Place is like a dose of sunshine beamed into your ears), and more downbeat baroque material too – Church Bells has a lovely pastoral atmosphere to it, and Ember Days is sparse and downbeat, with the D’Addario brothers harmonising perfectly.

Admittedly, sometimes it all becomes a bit too close to pastiche. In The Eyes Of The Girl (featuring Sean Ono Lennon, which isn’t a huge surprise) is so much like the Beach Boys you’d swear it was an outtake from Pet Sounds, and it’s impossible to listen to Peppermint Roses without thinking of Eric Idle’s parody band The Rutles. There’s also a nagging feeling throughout that it can slightly veer to being a bit too arch and mannered, especially when Rock On (Over And Over) opens almost exactly like a ’70s glam rock track.

By now though, you know what you’re getting with The Lemon Twigs – complaining that they sound too retro is a bit like saying the sun’s a bit hot. It’s not quite their Revolver, but who’s to say they won’t be releasing their very own Sgt Pepper by the time the year’s out?


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More on The Lemon Twigs
The Lemon Twigs – A Dream Is All We Know
The Lemon Twigs – Everything Harmony
The Lemon Twigs – Songs For The General Public
The Lemon Twigs – Do Hollywood